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5 Foods To Boost Your Mood Naturally

By Sally Shi-po POON (Registered Dietitian)

What we eat may affect the way we feel. Latest research found that a Mediterranean diet comprising higher intakes of fruit and vegetables, fish and whole grains, was associated with lowered risk of depression in adults. Dietitian Sally Shi-po POON suggests the following foods to help you boost your mood naturally:

 

  1. Germinated brown rice

Germinated brown rice is rich in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) that may help us relax and improve mood.  The amount of GABA in germinated brown rice was found to be 10 times more as compared to milled white rice and two times more than that of brown rice. It is very important to eat regular meals containing carbohydrates to make sure you will have stable amount of glucose in your blood throughout the day. Your brain needs glucose for concentration. Healthy sources of carbohydrates include whole grains, vegetables, fruits, legumes and low fat dairy. Not having enough glucose in the blood makes us feel tired and grumpy.

 

  1. Chicken

Chicken is rich in tryptophan – an amino acid that makes serotonin to boost your mood. More of this may cross to the brain when carbohydrate foods are eaten. Your body will get plenty of tryptophan if you eat a variety of protein-rich foods including meat, poultry, fish, seafood, eggs, dairy products, lentils, legumes, nuts and seeds.

 

  1. Spinach

Spinach is an excellent source of folate, a B vitamin that may help reduce the risk of depression. Asparagus, beef liver, Brussels sprouts, orange, kidney beans, and fortified breakfast cereals are also good sources of folate. Since it is a water-soluble vitamin, it is lost easily during cooking. This can be reduced by steaming or microwaving vegetables instead of boiling.

 

  1. Sardines

Sardines are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which may help lower the risk of depression. Aim for at least two servings of fish a week, each serving is 3.5 ounce (100g) cooked. Other fish like salmon, mackerel, herring, trout, and albacore tuna are also high in omega-3 fatty acids.

 

  1. Green tea

Green tea contains L-theanine – an amino acid that may help us stay calm and relaxed. At the same time, it works with the caffeine to improve concentration on mental tasks. It is vital to drink adequate fluids throughout the day as research shows that even a minor degree of dehydration can affect your concentration and mood. Aim for 6 to 8 glasses (1.5 to 2 litres) fluid per day: water, low-fat milk, plant-based milk, soups, tea and coffee all count.

 

Keep in mind that tea and coffee contain caffeine and drinking too much can cause health problems such as insomnia, headaches, dehydration, restlessness, and anxiety. Some people are more sensitive to the effects of caffeine than others. Up to 400mg of caffeine a day appears to be safe for most healthy adults, approximately the amount of caffeine in 4 cups of coffee.

 

Alcohol is a diuretic – drinking too much can lead to dehydration and B vitamin deficiencies, and can make you more depressed or anxious! Try to limit your alcohol intake to no more than 2 to 3 drinks on no more than 5 days per week.

 

As a rule, having regular meal patterns in a Mediterranean style will provide all the essential nutrients for both good health and good mood. Bon appétit!

 

Sally’s Nutrition Blog @ Hong Kong Tatler: https://hk.asiatatler.com/life/5-foods-to-naturally-boost-your-mood 

 

5 Dietitian-approved Foods To Fight Inflammation

By Sally Shi-po POON (Registered Dietitian)

Inflammation can be a long-term physiologic response to environmental toxins, infection, poor nutrition, stress, and aging. Chronic inflammation causes damage to body cells and eventually lead to diseases such as cancers, heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, depression, and Alzheimer’s disease. Studies have found that some nutrients from natural foods are safe and effective to help combat inflammation in the body. Here are 5 anti-inflammatory foods that I suggest:

1. Salmon
Salmon is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids that have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties. A study found women who ate more omega-3 had lower levels of inflammatory markers in the blood reflecting lower levels of inflammation, which might explain in part the effects of these fatty acids in preventing cardiovascular disease. The American Heart Association recommends eating fish (particularly fatty fish) at least two servings a week, each serving is 3.5 ounces cooked. Other fatty fish like albacore tuna, herring, lake trout, mackerel, and sardines are also high in omega-3 fatty acids.

2. Beans
Beans are rich in dietary fibre, antioxidants, and anti-inflammatory compounds, which help lower the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), one of the key markers of inflammation in the blood. Studies have found that a high fibre diet helps to reduce CRP levels. Fruits, vegetables, and whole grains also contain plenty of dietary fibre and antioxidants, which can fight inflammation.

3. Walnuts
Walnuts are packed with omega-3 fatty acids, dietary fibre, and phytonutrients that can protect against inflammation and promote healthy aging. Although nuts and seeds have anti-inflammatory benefits, they are high in calories so be mindful of portion sizes. Whilst the number of nuts per serving varies by type, a typical serving is 1 ounce (about 1/4 cup) or a small handful. One ounce of English Walnuts equals 14 halves.

4. Extra virgin olive oil
Extra virgin olive oil is the fresh juice that is squeezed directly from the olive fruit, it is credited as being one of the healthful components of the Mediterranean diet. Extra virgin olive oil is not refined or extracted using chemicals or heat, leaving it high in natural antioxidants, such as oleocanthal, which have significant anti-inflammatory properties. Although olive oil has lots of health benefits and tastes good in salad or pasta, it is energy dense so eating too much can cause weight gain. The healthy eating guideline recommends using 4 to 6 teaspoons of oil in your cooking or salad dressing a day.

5. Turmeric
Turmeric is very popular in grocery stores lately due to its promising anti-inflammatory benefit. Curcumin is the key active compound in turmeric but its absorption is poor. Consuming curcumin with some black pepper and healthy oils can enhance its absorption. It goes well with grains, beans, vegetables and white meats; and can enhance the flavour of soups and stews.

Extra tips on anti-inflammatory eating:
Foods that contribute to inflammation are the same ones generally considered bad for our health, including deep-fried foods, sugar-sweetened drinks, refined carbohydrates (such as white bread and pastries), red meat and processed meats. In general, an anti-inflammatory diet means your plate is dominated by a variety of colourful fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fish, nuts and healthy oils.

Sally’s Nutrition Blog @ Hong Kong Tatler: https://hk.asiatatler.com/life/5-dietitian-approved-foods-to-fight-inflammation